Gucci’s 80s Derivative Spring Handbags

July 17, 2018 by
Filed under: Gucci 

Gucci started Milan Fashion Week with a bang! Presented in an Ancient theme runway stage at the Gucci headquarters, the brand presents various bag designs that are truly a work of art for both Men and Women’s Collection. Alesandro Michele’s latest collection features a mix of styles, from vintage to classics and modern.

With ruins and Greco-Roman statues, fallen Roman columns, Aztec monuments, and a bandaged mummy peppered throughout Gucci’s Spring/Summer 2018 show venue, the first thought that came to mind was, with all these historical references, could Creative Director Alessandro Michele be going way back in history for the collection?

The season’s standouts were a couple of 80-s inspired pieces. One standout was a “fanny pack” style bag complete with all the design finishes of their ever-popular logo bags of the era; the classic taupe logo fabric, the green and red stripe – for those of us of a certain age, all finishes that speak to our luxury-minded 80s selves. For those true collectors who like a little more edge, their questionably-yet-intentionally misspelled “Guccy” cross body bags tap into a visual vibe of an 80s video game while maintaining a very tongue-in-cheek levity that somehow, seems to work despite itself.

Naturally, there are those who will find these two offerings derivative and they are undoubtedly right. However, sometimes, it’s just a matter of letting enough time pass to make those of us who are old enough to remember the era the first time around nostalgic for what the design house is offering. Wherever your opinion happens to fall on this one, the buzz that the house is generating with these two styles simply cannot be denied.For the Spring 2018 shows, Gucci has literally saturated the runways with such an abundance of handbags, it’s nothing short of an exhaustive effort to wade-through the offerings to the point of being able to pick a shortlist, let alone a favorite. However, that is not to say that there weren’t a few standouts in what was a seriously eclectic collection.

 

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